We’ve just made the best slime ever…..and it smells amazing!

This slime is so easy to make!

Here at Sciencedipity we help kids make a lot of slime. Whether it be at a school chemistry workshop, a fun community event or a birthday party, we have literally made 100s of pots of slime with kids.

We experiment a fair amount with different slime recipes, but this recipe is so fab, it really is our best slime ever. We’re so happy about our new slime that we’ve just got to tell you about it!

This slime is different.
This slime is amazingly soft and light.
This slime is soooo stretchy.
This slime smells devine.
This slime is not sticky.
This slime smells amazing.
This slime is sublime!!

The new slime is made using our standard recipe but with hair mousse added, which make it so soft and makes it smell great!

Its so easy to make (as our video shows) and here’s how we did it together with tips on the best glue and things you need to know about borax.

Materials used

Large bowl and something to stir with
PVA glue (see Lab Notes below)
Hair mousse
Food colouring
Saturated solution (about 4% solution ) of sodium tetraborate (aka Borax) (see Lab Notes below)
Glitter
Covering for table
Kids
Bag to store slime

Our method

  • We poured about 200ml of PVA glue (see Lab Notes below) into the bowl and added a large squirt of hair mousse.
  • We stirred this really, really well.
  • Next we added a few drops of food colouring.
  • Then we added the borax solution (see Lab Notes below), a little at a time using a pipette, and again stirred really well.
  • The slime started to form immediately, this is polymerisation reaction of the polyvinyl acetate (PVA) in the glue. But we really needed to feel the slime in our hands to determine if we needed to add some more Borax. So, we started to touch and squidge it. As it felt too sticky we added a splosh of borax, no pipette this time, we just gentle poured a splosh from the bottle. We kept kneading and squidging it until it was perfect!
  • As you can see the amount of borax used is down to preference, you may like your slime sticky or runny, but we prefer it to be slightly rubbery.¬†With the basic PVA glue & borax slime recipe, you can add too much borax and make a friable putty that doesn’t stretch, but we found with this mousse-y recipe that didn’t happen. Bonus!

Watch the video to see how easy it is to make

Lab notes

Avoid watching American videos on slime making as they use ingredients readily available over there (e.g. Elmers Glue). You can buy these items here in the UK, but they are not easy to find, are expensive and you dont need to bother with all that!

PVA glue
Not all PVA glues work, avoid the ones in the DIY section. We’ve had success with PVA craft glue from the well know UK shop, The Works, but our favourite is from the craft suppliers, Baker Ross. We’ve not found a clear PVA glue in the UK that is any good yet, that’s our current project!

BORAX
Nothing works as well as a saturated solution of sodium tetraborate. We avoid any alternatives. For example, some recipes suggest using contact lens cleaner that contains boric acid, some say use a starch solution, the kind for spraying on shirts to keep them crisp…..well, they just don’t work as well as Borax. You may have heard about safety concerns about borax – it’s your job to get informed about these safety issues, and make a decision based on the evidence. In the UK the raw material is classified as toxic, but a saturated solution, i.e. a 4% solution (equivalent to 40g/dm3) is of low hazard. At Sciencedipity, we wear Personal Protective Equipment when making up a solution of sodium tetraborate, and we make it up away from others. We keep the raw material out of reach of children and pregnant women. In case you were wondering, in America borax is readily available to buy in shops as a laundry supplement as it’s not classified as toxic over there!

If you tackle this activity at home you do so at your own risk. If you have as much fun as we did, feel free to share your pictures with us on Facebook.

Have fun sliming!
Bye for now

Ruth